Kansas City Royals Countdown: Top 10 Individual Offensive Seasons

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KANSAS CITY, MO - OCTOBER 28: Former Kansas City Royals star Mike Sweeney is seen before Game Two of the 2015 World Series at Kauffman Stadium on October 28, 2015 in Kansas City, Missouri. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
KANSAS CITY, MO - OCTOBER 28: Former Kansas City Royals star Mike Sweeney is seen before Game Two of the 2015 World Series at Kauffman Stadium on October 28, 2015 in Kansas City, Missouri. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images) /
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DETROIT – JULY 12: American League All-Stars Mike Sweeney (L) of the Kansas City Royals and Johnny Damon of the Boston Red Sox pose together on the field during the 76th Major League Baseball All-Star Game on July 12, 2005 at Comerica Park in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo By Dave Sandford/Getty Images)
DETROIT – JULY 12: American League All-Stars Mike Sweeney (L) of the Kansas City Royals and Johnny Damon of the Boston Red Sox pose together on the field during the 76th Major League Baseball All-Star Game on July 12, 2005 at Comerica Park in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo By Dave Sandford/Getty Images) /

The Kansas City Royals have had plenty of great individual offensive seasons during their history. Here’s our countdown of the top single-season outputs.

There’s been no shortage of great hitters throughout the history of the Kansas City Royals. From the days of George Brett and Willie Wilson, to the days of Carlos Beltran and Johnny Damon, to the days of Eric Hosmer and Lorenzo Cain, there have often been multiple star bats in the lineup.

Team success didn’t always follow, but the individual achievements shouldn’t be forgotten. We already took a look at the best seasons for pitchers in Kansas City Royals history. Now, it’s time to count down the top single-season offensive performances.

If we wanted, this list could have just been based on offensive WAR. However, that would eliminate some of the fun. Not to mention the fact that Brett would hold half the 10 spots, including the top four.

One of the difficult things is comparing seasons across different eras of baseball. Obviously, numbers from the early 2000s are going to be inflated compared to those of the 1980s. It’s also hard to balance prioritizing power, average and speed when it comes to selecting the best seasons. As with the pitching list, we have allowed players to have multiple seasons. But we did our best to include as many different players as possible.

We’ll start out with those who just missed the cut.

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