Kansas City Royals Countdown: Top 10 Outfielders

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KANSAS CITY, MO - SEPTEMBER 7: Alex Gordon
KANSAS CITY, MO - SEPTEMBER 7: Alex Gordon /
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3 Mar 2002: Manager Hal McRae of the Tampa Bay Devil Rays watches his team during the spring training game against the Atlanta Braves at Disney’s Wide World of Sports in Kissimmee, Florida. DIGITAL IMAGE. Mandatory Credit: M. David Leeds/Getty Images
3 Mar 2002: Manager Hal McRae of the Tampa Bay Devil Rays watches his team during the spring training game against the Atlanta Braves at Disney’s Wide World of Sports in Kissimmee, Florida. DIGITAL IMAGE. Mandatory Credit: M. David Leeds/Getty Images /

4. Hal McRae (1973-87, 27.7 WAR)

One of the longest tenured Royals in history, Hal McRae spent 15 seasons in Kansas City. His run with the Boys in Blue included every franchise playoff appearance until the 2014 team broke through.

McRae, who went on to manage the Royals, had several impressive seasons with the club. In 1975 and 1976, he made consecutive All-Star appearances. He finished fourth in MVP voting in 1976 after leading the league in on-base percentage with a whopping .407 and a .868 OPS.

In 1976, he finished fourth in MVP voting after leading the league in on-base percentage with a whopping .407 and a .868 OPS.

His next season, in many ways, was arguably better. His on-base percentage came back down to earth, but he led the league with 54 doubles. McRae also hit 21 home runs and had 92 RBI—an increase of 13 home runs and 19 RBI over the previous year.

Towards the end of his career, McRae began exclusively playing as a designated hitter. His best season ever came in his age-36 campaign in 1982. McRae won his only Silver Slugger award, made his third and final All-Star Game and again finished fourth in MVP voting. He had 46 doubles, 27 home runs and 133 RBI. His doubles and RBI total led the league, while his homers and RBI were career-highs.

Even at the age of 39, McRae still made a major impact on the Kansas City Royals in 1985. He had 14 home runs and 70 RBI, although his average dipped to .259. McRae only had three plate appearances in the World Series that year. However, he hit .444 (with Cincinnati in 1972) and .375 (with Kansas City in 1980) in his other two World Series.

He coached the Kansas City Royals for two full seasons and parts of two others. McRae also coached Tampa Bay for parts of two seasons. In total, his managerial record is 399-473, but he went 286-277 with the Royals.

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