May 28, 2014; Kansas City, MO, USA; Houston Astros batter Chris Carter (23) celebrates with teammates after hitting a three run home run against the Kansas City Royals during the sixth inning at Kauffman Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Peter G. Aiken-USA TODAY Sports

Astros Power Their Way Past Royals 9-3


What a difference a month makes. When the Royals first faced the Houston Astros, they left Houston with a three game sweep. Now, the tables have been turned, and the Royals have been swept at home, losing 9-3 this afternoon.

The game started out as badly as possible for the Royals. After Jose Altuve reached on an error, George Springer continued to show what an actual power hitting prospect should look like at the major league level, sending starter Danny Duffy‘s offering over the center field wall for a two run home run.

The hits came on coming for the Astros. Houston loaded the bases with two outs in the second, bringing up Dexter Fowler. Fowler dropped a base hit to right, plating two runs to give the Astros a 4-0 lead. Carlos Corporan had an RBI double in the third to give extend the lead to 5-0 before the Royals even had a chance to cycle through their lineup.

Kansas City finally got on the board in the bottom of the fourth. With two outs, Eric Hosmer and Alcides Escobar hit back to back doubles, as the Royals finally put a run on the board against Astros starter Jarred Cosart. As unlikely as it may be for the Royals to put six runs on the board given the way their offense has performed, the was a glimmer of hope.

That hope was quickly extinguished by Chris Carter. Leading off the fifth, Carter hit a home run to left to give the Astros a five run lead once again. While Kansas City was able to get an unearned run in the bottom of the inning, Carter blasted a three run home run deep to left, giving the Astros a 9-2 lead and putting the final nail in the coffin.

Brett Hayes hit his first home run of the year in the bottom of the seventh, providing the final run in the Royals 9-3 defeat. Duffy took the loss, giving up six runs, five earned, on seven hits and five walks in 4+ innings. Aside from Hayes getting his first two hits of the season, there really were not any positives from this series. Hopefully, with the Blue Jays coming to town, the Royals can get back into the win column.

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  • Terry LeRoy Payne

    I just couldn’t keep watching the pitiful performance by the Royals today. Teams have their ups and downs, but being swept by the worse team in baseball? Things could probably improve and based on statistics they will at least some. I fear that by the end of June the fat lady will be singing!

    • cardsfanatik

      Well, more to your point, when you get swept by the worst team in baseball, how in the hell can things not get better?

  • jimfetterolf

    Have you watched Springer’s swing? Tossing fastballs up and over in a 3-1 count is probably not a good strategy against an upper cut launched early and fast.

    • moretrouble

      Take a look at the video … watch it in segments, stopping at critical points: Belt high FB on the inner half … beautiful swing by Springer … he basically gets his hands out and barrels the ball out of the park. He looked good at the yard today … even better on video.

      • jimfetterolf

        Springer’s weaknesses look to be down and off speed. He has an early launch, from the heels upper cut and “get me over” fastballs in hitters counts are Christmas presents for him.

        • Dave Hill

          I would agree that Springer could be gotten down and away. I would also think that good offspeed pitches would be effective against him as well, as he seems to be sitting dead red right now. Wonder how long it will take teams to adjust.

        • moretrouble

          I disagree with you about Springer … he doesn’t swing from the heels, he doesn’t uppercut … he’s a fine young hitter.

          Where we do agree is the location on the pitch he hit today. I don’t think Duffy meant to throw that pitch belt high on the inner half. To quote Duffy, “I made horrible pitches to people who have some pop. My command today was hogwash.” In addition, Duffy really didn’t have his good fastball today.

          But, Springer brought his A game. He’s a nice looking hitter; I like him.

          • jimfetterolf

            Videos I saw showed what I said. Agree he’s a fine hitter and a guy with pop should swing that way in hitter’s counts if he sees a fastball in a spot. Ventura, Duffy, and the sacrificial relievers thrown in to eat innings gave him what he needed, Guthrie didn’t.

          • moretrouble

            We’re going to have to agree … to disagree on that point. I watched a considerable number of Springer swings last night .. and I like him. I see nothing wrong with Springer’s swing mechanics. I would mention that none of the swings are perfect — the perfect “cage” swing is nearly impossible against live pitching.

            Springer comes as advertised. He has done nothing to make me think he’s overrated. Not that he’s better than some of the KC hitters .. he’s not. It’s just that we see the KC hitters on a daily basis, so anytime Machado, Trout, or any of the other fine young hitters come to town, it’s great to watch them in person.

          • jimfetterolf

            I like Springer’s swing for a hitter’s count, it’s fast, repeatable, and has good loft to it, probably a perfect example of a power hitter’s swing, similar to what we’ll see on most home run cuts. But pitchers will book him, sliders away, change up in an FB count, cutters up and in. That’s the cycle of adjustments in the game. He’s dangerous enough to pitch around, which some of the Royals’ pitchers probably should have done, but he does have some holes as shown by his whiff locations.

  • The Plaindealer

    Good to see a top prospect doing well. Astros are loaded – top farm system in Majors. Heck, Royals should have the top farm system, what with all the former high-end first round picks down there. Moustakas (2 overall), Starling (5 overall) and Colon (4 overall).
    And someone wants to try and pick apart Springer’s weak spots in his swing? Geezus!! The Royals should be so blessed to have such weak spots.

    • jimfetterolf

      Pitchers will pick it apart. They make adjustments. One of the guys at fangraphs did a piece on it. One of our posters here looked at whiffs. That’s what serious baseball chatterers do.

      • The Plaindealer

        I see. Well, when someone figures it out, Jim, in that most serious chattering way, then tell Ned. Because that boy Springer ripped the a Royals a new one and all the serious lip service in the world couldn’t stop him.

        • jimfetterolf

          All gets down to execution. Ventura, Duffy, and a few fringe relievers couldn’t execute.

          • The Plaindealer

            Royals scored 5 runs in 3 games. Five. Count ‘em. It’s more systemic than Ventura, Duffy and “fringe” relievers, whoever that refers to.

          • jimfetterolf

            We were talking about pitching to Springer. Try to keep up.

          • The Plaindealer

            No. Jr. GMDM. You said it all comes down to execution, of Ventura, Duffy and fringe relievers as you put it. I thought I’d point out that the Royals pitiful offense had something to do with it, too. C’mon now, be a little flexible in your discourse.

          • jimfetterolf

            Royals’ offense is purely a matter of execution, no big secret about that. Poor mechanics, poor approach, poor pitch recognition, poor hacks. We’ve talked about that. Again, try to keep up.

          • The Plaindealer

            Nice recovery, Jr. GMDM. Very nice.

          • jimfetterolf

            Just a matter of knowing what has been discussed. We talk about offense quite a bit and in quite a bit of detail. Like defense and pitching, it’s part of the game. Do you have any ideas of what the hitters are doing? Ned Yost has talked about it, Lee Judge, several of us who follow these things. Easy to see, hard to change.

          • The Plaindealer

            Do I have any idea what the hitters are doing? WTF are you talking about? Offense is part of the game? Really? Do you think you belong to some inner circle, super secret club that is the only group that knows what’s going on with this offense? Don’t let anyone see you doing the secret handshake, or you’ll give up the goods for sure.

          • jimfetterolf

            So tell us what is going on with the offense. I cited a couple of sources at the professional and media level and we all pretty much agree on the problems. Gotta identify the problem so you can fix it.

  • Bear Brinkman

    Missed the game today but can’t say I was surprised to see what happened.I was watching a game over the weekend against the Angels and twice during the game I saw Royals forget how many outs their were.One time Hosmer held up before touching second on the play they gave Trout an error on.There were already 2 outs so he should have been hauling ass on the crack of the bat. Another time after the player struck out for the third out Salvy remained in his squat and started to throw the ball back until he saw the pitcher was already gone. I think something with
    concentration,coaching…there is just something wrong in that clubhouse/dugout.

  • catfishjohn

    I know that being pissed at the team’s performance is all the rave
    nowadays, but the Blue Jays are not, in fact, coming to town. I’m glad
    that everyone who understands the game so well, who understands the
    process, the intent of the front office in such insider fashion is up
    posting on message boards instead of fixing swings or picking up the
    bullpen phone, ready to get the arms warm when the time’s right.

    Seriously,
    though, what’s with the blind homerism MT? And, to a lesser degree, Jim
    Fetterolf? You say you aren’t emotionally invested in the game? Really?
    Then why so many posts about the team? Why so much to say to and about
    the “spreadsheet ninjas” and the talk radio hosts?

    I’m speaking
    purely as a fan here. A fairly educated fan who has listened to nearly
    every radio broadcast of this team for almost thirty years. I’m sick and
    tired of half-assed baseball in this town. I’m sick and tired of
    hearing excuses about weather, domes, and injuries.

    Why not do a
    comp of the Royals vs. every other small market team? Why not see how
    many other teams in similar financial pinches have done such a shitty
    job of drafting, developing, and maintaining talent? Small market teams
    are usually like waves. They crest–sometimes as World Champions, then
    collapse, recede, and rebuild to crest again. The A’s, Marlins, Twins,
    Pirates, Reds, Rays, Rockies, Diamondbacks are all teams that–while not
    all as financially constrained as the Royals have been–have seen
    higher, longer crests than we have, and have rebuilt their systems more
    successfully, and in shorter order than we have. Three of those teams
    have won the championship in the past decade and a half. ALL of them
    have been to the playoffs. NO team (in ALL of MLB) gave a GM a tenure longer than seven
    years without a playoff appearance.

    I’m speaking as a fan here.
    I’m not a spreadsheet ninja, and NO, I didn’t do any kind of quantifying
    research for my statements, so take it for what it’s worth. I’m a
    Royals fan. I’ve always been and will always be a Royals fan. And I have
    every right to be pissed off at this organization’s failure to be
    anything besides mediocre since the mid 80′s. Dayton has done a
    commendable job on some levels, and been an abject failure on some other
    levels. Yost has done a fine job of keeping this group playing hard and
    approaching respectability–but he’s also made some headscratching
    moves (firing Seitzer, leaving pitchers in too long, etc.), and may not
    be the man to take this group to the next level—if there even is one
    for this group. After all, Ned can’t go out and NOT swing at balls in the dirt in hitter’s counts, or spit on pitches while waiting for one he can drive any more than his team can.

    Yes, it’s not too late to make a strong surge.
    But after two years of shitty marketing by the front office “It’s our
    time”, etc., a completely absentee owner, and a still lackluster product
    on the field, what is there to be excited about besides Yordano
    Ventura? Because this group, with this leadership, and no more “next big
    thing” prospects anywhere near MLB ready, will only make a playoff push
    when they are spread around to teams who actually know what they are
    doing.

    It’s really irritating when some of you get on here and
    act like fans don’t have any reason to be pissed off. I’m talking to
    you, MT, with your common refrain when you mildly chastise the VOLUNTEER
    bloggers who write for this website–”Now, Hunter, you’re speaking like
    a fan…” As if speaking like a fan is a bad thing? WTF is any team
    without their fans? I’ll answer that for you, Montreal Expos. Sold to
    another city. Disbanded. Broke. Rooting for Sporting KC. We’ve (you
    know, MT, us dumb fans that don’t know our ass from a hole in the
    ground) spent thousands of dollars supporting this team for YEARS,
    always falling for the ole bait and switch, carrot on the stick routine.
    It’s getting old. We can see the team failing at the fundamentals, Jim
    Fetterolf, without reading swing mechanics books about which ass cheek
    should twitch first when taking a stab at a high hard one. So what’s the
    fix, geniuses? Are you going to teach these guys how to swing the bat,
    Jim? What about you, MT? Are you going to coach Dayton through his next
    draft? IF you won’t, then who will? Because it seems to me that they could use some guidance. Also, it seems as if you two don’t care about this team at all and salivate over your next opportunity to bemoan a fan grown weary with losing. If you aren’t frustrated with this team–almost to the point of
    insanity–then please, whatever you do, DON’T call yourself a fan. And
    DON’T act like those of us who are fans don’t have every reason to be
    rankled with this organization. Trust us, this kind of fury is a
    process. And it took a lot longer than 8 years to build.

    • cardsfanatik

      Dude………….I love you. That response, should be published as an article.

    • moretrouble

      Since part of your post was directed my way … I’ll respond in kind. I drop a chunk of change at the ballpark each year, too, so frankly, just stop with the logic that fans spend “thousands of dollars” so they deserve a winning team. They’re buying access to a major league game … that’s all. And, David Glass does a pretty good job of producing baseball in this town. The ball park is beautiful, parking is great, getting in and out of the park is easy, and the park is always clean.

      And, I love watching major league ball. It doesn’t really matter what team I’m watching … I just love the sport. I don’t go out there to see KC win … you’re right about that. I go to watch both teams. I get to watch the best baseball players in the world about 20 minutes from my house — I couldn’t be happier.

      What I really dislike about media comment sections is the character assassination that fans engage in … simply because the team loses. “Fire the manager … send this guy down to AAA ball … that guy is an idiot” … that kind of stuff. The world of social media is just vicious … comment sections seem to attract that kind of mentality for some reason. The KU/MU stuff that used to appear in the Star comment section was just sick.

      And, you’re right … I hold journalists to a higher standard than fans. Their analysis should be enlightening … these guys do a good job of that, but sometimes they slip into the kind of rhetoric that fans engage in … and I reject that.

      I have my complaints about the organization, who doesn’t? But, the individuals who work in the organization are all fine, honorable people. They’re intelligent, talented, honest, and hardworking. The KC team is going through some tough times right now. But, on the other hand, I loved seeing George Springer today. Wow … that kid can hit … Perhaps, I was the only one who enjoyed watching that kid play … I think there are a lot of “pure” baseball fans in this town … I’d like to see more of them talk about the game, instead of getting into personalities.

      • Ryan Caltrider

        How is it character assassination when you call for a manager to be fired? I don’t think those words mean what you think they mean. I’m sure Dayton Moore and Ned Yost are fine individuals. I am also sure that this team needs a shakeup and I’m sure that Ned Yost is not the man for the job. He needs to go now in my opinion. I don’t think now is a good time to let Dayton Moore go because the draft is coming up. As soon as the draft is over, I’d can him. This doesn’t mean I think they are bad people or that they kick puppies, just that someone else could do a better job than what they are doing. I’m sure they will land on their feet somewhere so I wouldn’t feel to bad for them.

        • moretrouble

          This is kind of an oblique reply … I hope you don’t take offense:

          It was Winston Churchill who said, “Any jacka** can kick a barn down. It takes a carpenter to build one.”

          Dayton Moore is building a program in Kansas City. Ned Yost is the right guy for what Dayton’s trying to build. Look at their progress in win totals the last three or four years. This season isn’t over yet. Be patient.

          • Ryan Caltrider

            Does it usually take 8+ years to build a f****** “barn”? Not if you’re a good “carpenter”. But I can see I’m wasting my breath if you feel that Dayton is actually building something worth a sh** in KC and if you feel that Ned is the right man for the job. Those are your opinions and you are entitled to them, I just don’t share them.

            And you are correct, technically this season isn’t over yet. But if you see anything in this team that tells you they are going to turn it around and contend then more power to you.

          • moretrouble

            I guess you’re wasting your time, then, because I think Dayton and Ned are doing a great job.

    • jimfetterolf

      You forgot to mention Lee Judge. I guess I’m impressed you put in such effort on a crippled up old man and your fakey screen name is cute.

      • catfishjohn

        Jim, for a crippled up old man–if indeed you are–then your response is awfully juvenile for a grown up. Sorry you take umbrage with my nickname. I’ve been called that since I was a boy and noodled catfish in the summertime.

        Anyhow, the point I was trying to make is lost on you. I’ve been reading this site, Pine Tar Press, the KCStar, and every other borderline legitimate Royals site for years–including the comments sections for each. I’m an avid fan, after all. Half the time, I appreciate the things you have to say. When you start condescending to other folks, as you’ve been doing on this site (and did in the past towards the writers on PTP) lately anytime someone expresses exasperation with the organization, yeah, it pisses me off. If you want to rag on the bloggers, Lee Judge, and all the others who write about the organization, why don’t you start your own blog? You could even call it “Serious Baseball Chatter” by Jim Fetterolf–since that’s what you claim to engage in already–and use your moderator priveliges to dispel posters whose opinions you don’t like.

        What’s your beef with Lee Judge? Besides the fact that he’s tirelessly pushing his book, I appreciate his perspective. Some of his write ups are boring and redundant for those who have an understanding of the game, but for a casual fan who likes the game and wants to understand it better, Lee fills an important void. He explains fundamentals and–unlike you and some others–admits when he’s wrong and asks coaches, players, and other insiders to explain things more clearly.

        I can appreciate that you are not emotionally invested in the team, and that you get a kick out of the psychology of fans–especially long suffering Royals fans. They certainly run the gamut in terms of game knowledge, strength of opinion, and understanding of what it takes to put a winning product on the field. I myself get a kick out of some of the ridiculous things I read and hear about this team from fans and writers alike.

        What I don’t like is condescension and derision. Maybe you can work on that a bit so you don’t come off like a curmudgeonly old bastard that thinks he knows everything.

        MT, thanks for the thoughtful response. I appreciate your perspective as well. You understand, I am sure, that the logic, as you call it, about spending money and therefore deserving a winning team is not as cut and dried as you suggest. I LOVE baseball, especially Royals baseball. I loved watching Affeldt buckle Barry Bonds with an “off the table” slider down and away several years ago. I was glad to be one of only 2,000 fans at the K when we set a record for low attendance in–I believe–05, when Kris Wilson had an absolute meltdown after pitching like shit and went off the field cussing in a stadium so quiet, you could hear it in the upper deck. I can appreciate watching George Springer because he is already a hell of a hitter and his ceiling is very high. I root for individual players who I admire.

        But I’m still a Royals fan, and I’ve waited a long time to see my team win. I’ve given the Glasses a lot of my money over the years, and not in a grudging way. But, good Lord, this team–a team no longer young enough not to know better–this team has some serious issues. The demeanor on the road against the Twins early on was the first alarm. The punchless offense, terrible plate posture and discipline, Butler bitching about missing at bats in an NL park (here’s a hint, fatass, get in game shape and play serviceable defense) and subtly digging at management, Dyson completely embodying Earl Weaver’s infamous rant about stealing bases. Is THIS the team we were all expecting? Is THIS team worth dropping a hundred bucks on?

        • jimfetterolf

          If you think I have a beef with Lee then you really haven’t been paying attention. Beyond that, you’re not the first post I’ve starred in and probably won’t be the last. I guess I should be honored. You do at least write well.

          Surprised you think I have an issue with David and Clint. Best overall site in the market.

          • catfishjohn

            Well, Jim, you’re right about PTP. I love that site. Always have. Pretty smart content. And, BTW, I thought it was pretty yellow of Mellinger to pull your post that exposed his blatant theft of Ed’s material. Not a big fan of ole Sam. At least Pos was sincere.

          • jimfetterolf

            Also caught a guy at fangraphs borrowed heavily from a really good Hunter piece. That’s not the first time I’ve busted Sam, won’t be the last. That’s the curse of the blogosphere, too many writers, including people actually getting paid, whose idea of research is to read several blogs, see which way the wind is blowing, borrow a thesis and some snappy lines, and put it out there. For all my flaws I do try to be original. That makes me come across as a contrarian fairly often, but I’ve never been much of a follower.

            I should thank you, you mentioned you appreciate my comments about half the time, that makes you the president of my fan club. I tend to be the off key voice in the echo chambers. One thing I like about KoK is that it’s probably the most balanced of sites, I don’t get banned here for different opinions.

            One thing, the book on swing mechanics was actually Ted Williams’ 50 year old “The Science of Hitting”. Nothing weird or arcane to it, all a matter of balance, discipline, recognition, and getting your pitch and doing something with it, in short everything the Royals don’t do. My learning the game dates to when Williams still played but I was taught the same stuff by guys who grew up on Cy Young and Ty Cobb. Basic stuff all the guys learned on sandlots, but then I watch Hosmer swing and he strides so far his hips don’t rotate and he hits a grounder to 2nd, or tonight watched some game day, Infante, late and down one, gets two quick balls, then tries to pull an outside change and grounds meekly to SS. I’ve suggested elsewhere that Dayton Moore should buy a copy of that book for every player and coach in the system and have pop quizzes.

          • catfishjohn

            I’m totally on board with your last paragraph. The only issue I have with swing mechanics is that I’m not sure that even the best coach can “fix” a naturally gifted player’s swing mechanics. So much of the “art” of swing mechanics is purely mental, which is why, in my opinion, so many of the best hitters (ie: George Brett) are lousy coaches. They can’t explain why they are able to move their body perfectly, regardless of batting stance, to bring their hands to the ball to either drive it, or simply move it in a positive direction (right side, advance the runner, etc.). Everything synchronizes with the gifted hitters. Just like George Springer yesterday, or Edwin Encarnacion tonight (though he just squared up, no comparison to Springer).

            Sometimes I wonder if the reason otherwise good hitters on our club can’t do anything with the ball is because they’ve been coached away from what they did best in the first place. Really, for the gifted hitters, the advanced levels are as much about pitch recognition and patience as they are about making adjustments to hit or lay off unfamiliar pitches. Brett has said a million times that the biggest key to his success as a hitter was just to relax. Maybe that’s what our hitters–and the rabid fans like me–need to remember more than anything.

            I’ve never read the book, though, so I’m speaking in ignorance. Maybe I should read it. While I don’t totally eschew sabermetrics, I’ve always been partial to the eye test, and the swing mechanics on this team are making me cross-eyed.

          • jimfetterolf

            I’m an eyeball guy, Williams just gives me a cite for my opinions. People like authority figures :) You might get the book, quick read, ten bucks at amazon, you’ll probably find yourself going, “Yeah, what the Splendid Splinter said.”

            One thing on Royals’ hitters: The Royals hitters’ last two stops in the minors are at Arvest and Werner Parks, which are probably the worst preparation imaginable for the K, both offensively and for outfielders. Hitters get in the habit of hitting lazy fly balls that are homers there and outs in KC. On prospects I watch what they do at Wilmington, that park separates the men from the boys. Moose hit .250/.297/.421 there. Hosmer hit .354/.429/.545 after his eye surgery.

          • catfishjohn

            I recall a post of yours talking about moving Omaha to Des Moines (in the ballpark sense, obviously), and it makes good sense. I live in Iowa now and have been to a couple games there. It seems not to make a lot of sense, organizationally, to have your prospects–in a stage of development where they are still trying to recognize pitches–playing full seasons in a cavern like Wilmington, then moving on to bandboxes like NWA and Omaha. Seems like it invites false expectations.

          • jimfetterolf

            As I recall, the Iowa Cubs have a big park and that’s what Royals’ hitters need to prove themselves in. Omaha is good for pitchers, if a guy can rack up a sub-3.00 ERA in the PCL he’s got some potential. That’s why I like Marimon.

          • catfishjohn

            That’s another pain in the ass I have with this franchise. Why not get creative and give Marimon a start when Duffy is experiencing “dead arm” and Ventura needs to bow out of the rotation for a start or two? If Moose is looking little league–as he did for most of his AB’s–why not see what you drafted in Colon at the MLB level? I realize Colon has some weaknesses and that smarter eyes are on the player than my own, but why not throw him out there instead of Paredes? Cuthbert has upside, but I don’t think our fans would appreciate the fact that his errors thus far are in the teens.

            Yeah, Des Moines is a bigger park than the new (and old) Stormchasers park. For the club, it seems reasonable to move high A to Omaha, keep AA in NWA, and shift AAA to Des Moines. You pick up a big chunk of market that way that currently roots for the Cubs, and, theoretically, you get your prospects closer to “K ready”, by moving the fences accordingly.

          • jimfetterolf

            Only thing on Marimon is he’s not on the 40-man roster. May be a problem putting him there if they don’t plan on keeping him on it, not sure how that works.

            Colon has slowly been hitting better, so I think he’ll be getting closer, but Royals like the speed and versatility of Paredes and Ciriaco. If the team collapses by the ASB we might see Colon.

        • moretrouble

          Personally, I don’t “expect” a winning team out at Kauffman. But, I do acknowledge your point — most fans do. I’m fine with that … and, maybe, I should overlook the negativity in the comment section. I’ll try harder, LOL.
          Best wishes …

          • catfishjohn

            A la the KU/MU type drivel and negativity, I don’t blame you one bit. But even you must admit–it’s not as if the organization didn’t set these fan expectations up on their own via marketing, slogans, and interviews. Most casual fans who freak out over our present underachieving offense felt like they were sold a bill of goods–and thus far, they have a point.

          • moretrouble

            Fan expectation is heightened by several factors … admitting that I’m no marketing expert … the media plays a huge role. While it’s true the club had high expectations for itself — I heard no one in the organization GUARANTEE anything, other than a full season of games.

            I disagree that an “underachieving offense” constitutes “a bill of goods, ” in the sense that fans are being cheated. At the time of a ticket purchase, there is simply no implied contract that stipulates the team will win games.

            I think it’s important to remember that Ewing Kauffman loved the fans … he was visible … as I said the other day … waving that white towel out the windows of the owner’s box. Kauffman cared for the community and wanted to build a winner for the fans.

            Glass is completely different. He’s never there, he lives out of town, he’s a single owner (in comparison to an ownership group) and tries to pull a profit from the club. It’s more a business than a civic institution to Glass. There is a corporate feel at the stadium that reminds me of … excuse the comparison, but … Walmart. It’s clean, efficient, customer friendly, but oddly impersonal. I’m not sure what my point is here … kind of got off on a tangent … must be having a senior moment, LOL.

          • catfishjohn

            No, I’m 100% on board with your last paragraph, and I don’t disagree with the rest, either. Your logic is sound, anyhow. It kind of feels like a “no man’s land”, in some sense, with a detached, profit driven owner. It certainly feels like he doesn’t care much for Kansas City.

            But if he wants to run the ship like a business owner, then I want my dividends as a shareholder. All the fans do. I’ll admit I was elated (duped) with David’s April Fool’s Day post that Glass had sold the team. It would sure be nice if we were governed by an owner as passionate about the organization, Kansas City, and baseball in general as the fanbase–sometimes inexplicably–still is.

    • The Plaindealer

      It is nowhere near character assassination to call for Ned to be replaced. It’s not judging the person, it’s judging the job he’s done. Take for instance the hitting coach position. Ned is on his sixth hitting coach since 2012. Now, I’ve managed people for 25 years. If I changed on of my mid-level management spots six times in two years, would that be a signal that there are no qualified managers for that position? Or, would it be more of a reflection on me as a manager? I guarantee, my best bosses in 25 years wouldn’t have blamed the talent pool under me.
      Ned was sold to us as a guy who could develop. Look what he did with those kids in Milwaukee, they said. Well, look at what he’s done with these kids.
      The problem is systemic. The root must be addressed. It’s not personal. It’s performance.