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The Future for Christian Colon

Every free agent signing has it’s positives and negatives. On the plus side, a hole in the lineup or in the pitching staff is filled instantly without having to worry about whether or not the prospect brought in to fill that spot will pan out. However, there is the drawback of the financial obligations to that player. Also, depending on how long the player is signed for, prospects may be blocked on their way to the major leagues. With the Royals signing of Omar Infante, the latter scenario appears to be the case for Christian Colon.

Aug 18, 2012; Papillion, NE, USA; Omaha Storm Chasers shortstop Christian Colon (4) in the first inning against the Nashville Sounds at Werner Park. Mandatory Credit: Matt Ryerson-USA TODAY Sports

As recently as a week ago, Colon appeared as though he may get an opportunity to prove that he could be the Royals primary second baseman in 2014. Although not a top prospect, Colon had displayed a knack for putting the bat on the ball and an ability to draw walks. Last season, he added a bit of power to his game, hitting twelve home runs for Omaha. Although the Pacific Coast League does inflate offensive totals, the power surge was certainly an added bonus for the type of player that Colon has been.

Despite seemingly being on an accelerated path through the minors, Christian Colon now appears to be blocked at second base. Yet, that does not necessarily mean that he cannot be a factor for the Royals in the future. Colon had been drafted as a shortstop, and could find a role with the Royals as a backup middle infielder, playing a couple of times a week to rest Infante and Alcides Escobar. He could also be a solid insurance policy if Escobar continues to disappoint offensively. While most of Escobar’s value is provided by his glove, the lack of production that he provided last season, where his .234/.259/.300 batting line was below the lofty offensive heights set by such hitters as Rafael Belliard, just was not acceptable. Colon would, almost by default, be a better offensive option.

Another possibility is that Colon could be included in a trade. With the Royals surplus of fourth outfield types and relievers, Colon could potentially be added as a chip to help bring over a piece that could help their chances of contending in 2014. While the Royals have their problems at second base seemingly solved with the addition of Infante and Emilio Bonifacio, there are still other teams that could use a player such as Colon.

In the end, Christian Colon could have an impact upon the Royals in 2014, but it may not be in the way he was expected to. In fact, Colon’s biggest impact on the Royals could be in who he brings back to the Royals.

Topics: Christian Colon, Kansas City Royals

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  • KingofKauff

    Great picture of a Rey Navarro. How does he factor in? Anyway, Colon’s return is not worth a trade. Infante would need to get injured/moose and play beyond his skills for a period of time. He’s valued as a utility type right now, which means a minimal return of maybe a reliever.

    • Dave Hill

      Which is why I wonder if he would be someone that could be involved in a package deal. However, I think he makes infinitely more sense to keep around as the backup middle infielder. With Bonifacio being able to play all over the diamond, the Royals have plenty of options on the bench.

      • moretrouble

        Why would KC move Colon – he provides organizational depth. I’m sure Colon would love to be traded, though. He just lost his shot at making the big club. Of course, then there’s Johnny G.

        • KingofKauff

          I feel bad for Johnny G. All things being considered, the royals created the dilemma themselves at second base. Dating back to Aviles/Getz/Gia, Betancourt/Getz/Gia, Getz/Johnson/Tejeda/Gia. They decided to have so many options at the position for comfort it worked against them because Ned had his nervous twitch. Whoever played well got the next start and eventually got no production because of it. I know I am in the minority, but Hosmer, moose, gordon, escobar, Butler etc got daily at bats regardless of priors day performance if you do the research. Hosmer got 8 months straight to turn it around, in May, fans were screaming for him and especially Moose to be sent down. The commitment financially to Infante is the best thing they have done at second, so now Yost will feel obligated to play him. Yost can not be given options plain and simple. He needs to be spoon fed so no thinking is involved.

          • Dave Hill

            To be honest, I have never understood exactly what Moore sees in Yost. This is the guy that was fired by the Brewers during a September playoff push, after all.

          • moretrouble

            No offense, Dave, but you’re talking like a fan. How long are fans going to beat up Yost over being fired in 2008? Probably until the next manager comes along – then they’ll beat him up, too.

            What does Moore see in Yost? Yost has the support of his players; they love the guy. Yost has ten years experience managing in the big leagues – you been around that long, you’re gonna have been fired once or twice.

            Yost works well with management. Yost has always agreed with management – that this organization must develop their talent at the MLB level because they don’t have enough money.

          • Dave Hill

            It just makes me question if he is the right guy to lead the Royals to the playoffs, is all. He and Moore do seem to work well together, but I just wonder if he can take the Royals to the next level.

            Then again, I really wanted Ozzie Guillen when he left the White Sox, so I am admittedly not the best judge of such things.

          • moretrouble

            Most any experienced manager could take KC to the next level because the team is good enough now.

          • Dave Hill

            Another reason why I figure that this season could be a big one for Yost.

          • moretrouble

            Well, I agree with you on that point. We’ll see if the momentum from the last half of the year carries over to next season. The stat guys ignore big Mo, but I think it’s important. The psychology of the game is huge.

          • jimfetterolf

            Dave, then the Brewers took the team to the playoff, then kind of withered away and fired Yost’s successor in Milwaukee, who is now in KC. Just about every manager is hired to be fired and I think you would agree that not all GMs are geniuses. I agree with mo’ trouble on this one, but there are those who see in KC an unholy trinity of David Glass as ha’Satan, Dayton Moore as the false prophet, and Ned Yost as the antichrist. Every market has that niche, the chronic boo birds, the Negative Nancys. I know several personally. Two of them are Cardinals’ fans who were cursed by being born in KC. “Next year in Sr. Louis!”

          • Dave Hill

            I can understand why people feel that way. To me, Yost has a lot riding on this season, perhaps more than anyone else in the front office/coaching staff. All the pieces seem to be in place – he needs to bring it all to fruition.

          • jimfetterolf

            Given reasonable health and luck, this is a 90 win team. ’12 was an 81 win team until Paulino and Duffy blew up, Perez got hurt, Cain got hurt, Getz got his concussion, etc. Last year health was better and with two new pitchers yet starting with Frenchy and Getz the team produced to expectation, the average prediction from the KoK staff was 84.8 wins, mine was 85, Rany hit the bullseye with 86 wins. To me, that says that Yost has done his job. But ultimately, it’ up to the players and I think they’re ready, they got a sniff last year, they played well against successful teams, they came close but had no one to blame but themselves.

            As competitive as ballplayers are, they’ll have the fire in the belly and I don’t expect any long losing streaks this time. They know exactly why they stayed home last year and what they need to do this year. I’m optimistic. More maturity, more experience, more talent with Aoki, Infante, Duffy, and Ventura. This is a better team.

          • moretrouble

            I agreed with your post; very insightful – up until the last sentence. Yost is a very good manager, his team loves him, he works well with management and his game tactics are sound. He doesn’t need to be spoon fed anything. He was a catcher at the big league level, an MLB coach, and he’s got ten years experience managing in the big leagues. If anything – it’s an entire generation of KC fans who must be spoon fed because they never closely followed baseball until recently..

      • KingofKauff

        Agreed on keeping him around, using him as a throw in as a trade is a big pill to swallow at this point considering how high he was drafted. He has more value to us than anyone else at this point.

  • jimfetterolf

    I figure Colon starts at Omaha with a chance to improve, as he still needs offensive work and work at 2B and 3B, then he eventually replaces Ciriaco during this year or next year as UIF. Should Escobar get hurt or Moose demoted Colon comes up, being second behind Eskie on the SS depth chart.

    The signing of Infante tells me the Royals don’t see Colon as a potential every day 2nd baseman, see Bonifacio as more valuable as a versatile UIF whose speed can also help replace the loss of Dyson, and don’t see Gio at all.

  • jimfetterolf

    I would note that Sam has predicted 90 wins for the Royals this year.