Kansas City Royals: George Brett’s Five Most Memorable Moments

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Sep 1, 2015; Kansas City, MO, USA; Kansas City Royals former players (from left to right) Dan Quisenberry, represented by Janine Quisenberry-Stone, Frank White, Brett Saberhagen, and George Brett were honored before the game against the Detroit Tigers at Kauffman Stadium. Detroit won the game 6-5. Mandatory Credit: John Rieger-USA TODAY Sports
Sep 1, 2015; Kansas City, MO, USA; Kansas City Royals former players (from left to right) Dan Quisenberry, represented by Janine Quisenberry-Stone, Frank White, Brett Saberhagen, and George Brett were honored before the game against the Detroit Tigers at Kauffman Stadium. Detroit won the game 6-5. Mandatory Credit: John Rieger-USA TODAY Sports /
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Mandatory Credit: Ed Szczepanski-USA TODAY Sports
Mandatory Credit: Ed Szczepanski-USA TODAY Sports /

4. When George Brett punched Graig Nettles

Back in the mid 1970’s and into the early 1980’s, the New York Yankees and the Kansas City Royals were true rivals. As the best teams in the American League, they ran into one another four times in the playoffs from 1976 through 1980. Unfortunately, the Yankees came out on top in the first three meetings, until the Royals broke through in 1980 for their first World Series appearance.

Needless to say, that rivalry was hotly contested, with the Yankees and Royals truly coming to dislike one another due to their postseason battles. As was occasionally the case with these games back in those days, those emotions would boil over onto the field, leading to the odd skirmish. Such was the case in Game Five of the 1977 ALCS, which the Yankees ended up winning in comeback fashion.

However, it is best remembered for the incident between Brett and Yankees third baseman Graig Nettles. In the top of the first, Brett tripled into the right center gap, sliding hard into third. After Nettles kicked him, Brett then jumped up, throwing a punch at Nettles, leading to the benches clearing as the two combatants were separated.

Amazingly enough, Brett and Nettles were allowed to remain in the game, showing how different baseball was back almost forty years ago.

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