Apr 27, 2014; Baltimore, MD, USA; Kansas City Royals starting pitcher James Shields (33) throws in the second inning against the Baltimore Orioles at Oriole Park at Camden Yards. Mandatory Credit: Joy R. Absalon-USA TODAY Sports

Kansas City Royals end road trip with 9-3 victory over Orioles


Apr 27, 2014; Baltimore, MD, USA; Kansas City Royals starting pitcher James Shields (33) throws in the first inning against the Baltimore Orioles at Oriole Park at Camden Yards. Photo by: Joy R. Absalon-USA TODAY Sports

Kansas City Royals (12-12) starter James Shields (3-2, 2.03) tossed three-hit ball over seven innings of work Sunday afternoon at Camden Yards as the Royals topped the Baltimore Orioles 9-3.

Shields allowed two runs, both earned, on two walks and six strikeouts. Miguel Gonzalez (1-1, 5.40) took the loss for the O’s.

The game moved at a slow pace at first, with the Royals nursing a 2-0 lead through four. In the fifth, however, Alcides Escobar singled to lead off the inning. One out later, Nori Aoki singled moving Escobar to third. Omar Infante, who had six runs batted in on the afternoon, doubled to left, scoring both runners and increasing the Royals lead to 4-0.

After a Nelson Cruz 2-run homer in the sixth cut the lead in half, Infante answered in the seventh with a 2-out, 2-run blast, scoring Aoki and increasing the margin to 6-2. Later in the inning, Eric Hosmer and Billy Butler singled ahead of an Alex Gordon double that plated both runners, making the score 8-2. Mike Moustakas added an RBI double in the ninth.

The O’s scored one run off Greg Holland in the bottom of the ninth.

NOTABLES: Every Royals starter had at least one hit. Omar Infante‘s home run finally put the Royals in double digits in that category (10) for the season.

NEXT: The Toronto Blue Jays come to town to face the Royals in a 3-game set. Dustin McGowan (1-1, 6.88) squares off against Jason Vargas (2-0, 1.54) at 7:10 p.m.

WRITER’S NOTE: Yes, even though the post-game voice who hosts the radio call-in show dismissed this fact, it’s true that Manager Ned Yost brought in Greg Holland to “preserve” an 8-2 game today, yet left Holland sitting on the pine in yesterday’s extra-inning loss. Now, we all know he just wanted Holland to have a little work tonight. Yet, even though Yost told the Kansas City Star that he would never use Holland in a game like yesterday until it was a save situation, it’s difficult to grasp any rationale for his use today vs. his need yesterday. The easiest way to approach the conundrum, if I were a radio host, would be, I suppose, to just hang up on any caller who would sensibly bring up this puzzler. That would teach ‘em.

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Tags: Kansas City Royals

  • jimfetterolf

    Easy to grasp “need to work” as well as saving the closer on the road ’til the lead. Any caller who brings up this puzzler likely has a soccer background and is just trolling. BTW, this isn’t the first time today I’ve seen this.

    • John M Dowd

      I agree. If we used Holland in the tenth then score later who do we have left we trust to close?

      • kibo

        I’m sorry sometimes my sarcasm meter is off. You guys are kidding right?

        • jimfetterolf

          No.

        • The Plaindealer

          No. They’re really not kidding.

      • The Plaindealer

        But if you never get to “later,” what difference does it make?

    • The Plaindealer

      I’m glad you’ve seen others who share my view. You can save your closer all day long, unless of course he never gets in the game. Then you’ve saved him…for what? So he can pitch a scrub inning in an 8-2 game because he needs the work?

      • jimfetterolf

        Common meme, likely originated with talk radio. Holland wasn’t saved for a scrub inning, he was saved for when the Royals took the lead in the extra innings. Turned out he wasn’t needed after Duffy blew up, but if you use him instead of Duffy, three innings later who do you use when the Royals get the lead? This is fairly common conventional wisdom. Yost made the right moves, Duffy failed. Nature of the game.

        • The Plaindealer

          I said it originated on a talk radio show. But that’s not the point.
          The point is, you can play to get to your closer. Or you can use your closer to get to a point where you score more runs than the opponent. You may have noticed…yet, you may not have noticed…that Orioles Manager Buck Showalter used his closer, Tommy Hunter, in the two innings preceding the winning run scoring. Imagine that. Showalter must be an idiot. Or, Yost did everything right and still managed to lose. Go figure!!

          • jimfetterolf

            Yost doesn’t use Holland more than one inning and Showalter was at home and does. Blaming Yost for Duffy plunking a guy and throwing two balls away is really a stretch.

          • The Plaindealer

            You can’t make blanket statements like that. To say Showalter uses Hunter for longer than one inning stretches is just not true. If you take away the 1.2 innings he pitched the other night, Hunter has appeared in eight other games in which he has thrown seven innings. My math says that’s fewer than one inning per appearance. So, Showalter doesn’t use his closer for more than one inning, generally, as you tried to convey. Point is, Jim, when you’re trying to prolong the game until your offense can score, Holland is a better bet to prolong the game than is Duffy (as we all saw the other night!). Showalter knows this fact, which is why in THIS situation he left his closer out there for 1.2 innings. But, if you think Yost made the right move, then your argument and his results speak for themselves. I’ll just have to agree to disagree.

          • jimfetterolf

            “Generally” is the word. With Yost and Holland it is closer to never. Duffy and Davis are the preferred two inning guys for the Royals now.

            As for Duffy, he’s been good so far and picked a bad time for an off night. Every pitcher has them.

            Pleasant disagreement is fine. That’s how we learn.

          • The Plaindealer

            Well, generally speaking, Yost tends to manage not to lose. Showalter manages to win. That’s my take, and I’m sticking to it.

          • jimfetterolf

            Looks like Ned Yost had the better idea.

          • The Plaindealer

            Huh? What? The Royals lost. If his idea was how to best lose the game, then yes, Ned hit the nail on the head.

          • jimfetterolf

            Royals took two of three from the O’s, their brilliant manager, and the two high priced free agents so many of the chattering class was demanding to be signed.

          • kibo

            You are incredible. Wow!

  • The Plaindealer

    Might want to get to the point where you have a lead before you save your best players preparing for it. You just might not ever get there if you don’t use your best weapons.

    • unclejesse40

      The problem that I see is that you are taking out of consideration that so far this year the offense has been horrible. The idea of extra innings doesn’t scare a team that has shown the ability to score runs consistently. But when you have a team that plays 2-1 and 3-2 games night in and night out, as a manager I can completely understand not wanting to put Holland in when the game might go 15 innings. And the truth is so far this year Duffy has been throwing bb’s. Had Yost put in say Herrera who is homer prone I could see the point better, but he didn’t. To my knowledge Duffy hadnt even given up a run yet, seems like a pretty good track record to me. Baseball is a freakislhy long marathon and not a 100 meter sprint. Now say the same scenario happens in Toronto and Yost does the opposite, then I would be really mad because it would show me he doesnt have a plan and just goes off emotion.

      • The Plaindealer

        I understand that’s how Yost wanted to play it. Showalter, on the other
        hand, threw his closer out there for 1.2 innings. Personally, I’d take
        the Showalter approach and know I gave my team its best chance to prolong the game. Truly, if you wanted to be assured of shutting the other team down in extra innings, where every inning could be your last, Holland is the Royals best bet.
        As
        far as home runs allowed, Duffy allows a home run every 10.7 innings
        pitched vs. Herrera (9.7), so it’s not as if Duffy doesn’t give up the
        long ball. If the long ball were the deciding factor, then Holland would
        be the obvious choice since his career mark in that category is half that of the two.
        Baseball is a marathon. Very true. But I want to win each
        leg of the race. Yost, in my opinion, manages not to lose, whereas
        Showalter manages to win.

        • unclejesse40

          I know I can’t know the future but something tells me if Duffy were to stay in the pen all year his average number of innings pitched without a home run would go up. Herrera’s fast flat fastball has always scared me a little.