Moose to mouse, hush to hero


It’s that time of the season again.  A season bamboozled with confusion, let down, and angst. I’m a fan of Mike Moustakas, I really am…a second overall pick with plenty of upside…somewhat of a baseball golden ticket just waiting to be discovered. So we hope in epic proportions we will witness the next George Brett.

Right? Isn’t that how this goes?

Is it too soon to make this an early day Alex Gordon comparison?  I mean what else are members of the Royals baseball media supposed to do? Chat victory?

Moose is hurting right now. It’s known and known well. Up, down, left, and right…the kid is stinking up the joint at a noticeably consistent pace. Some feel that “lost” is the best word, but I disagree. I believe we as Royals fans owe a tremendous and heart felt favor to the future- Moustakas especially.

To HUSH our demanding mouths and let talent find victory on it’s own.

Let it be known that Royals fans make as many mistakes as “fans” as Royals players make on the actual playing grounds. As Royals fans we tend to shiver at times when it could have been a little colder…we get frustrated when it could have been much worse.

Certainly, there are times when we hound on players for results and quickly ditch them before they can redeem themselves. That’s what happened in the Alex Gordon chronicles.

He was labeled a SAVIOR for the organization before he could blink!

Mistake numero uno.

I’ll tell you what…if you really think one player can single handedly resurface the rough edges of a franchise then you are a complete fool! It’s about having above average players at every position.

George Brett was a superstar, but we didn’t win the World Series strictly due to his presence. He had an above average supporting cast, one we all know about, which is the type of example you will find in all championship teams. Sure, the press loves to highlight the most talented and accessible players on the winning team (its media suicide not to), but you need to give credit where credit is due, and more often than not, it’s to the entire operation.

I think that it took Alex Gordon three or four years longer to actually heal from the public weigh down we all gave him and that was about three to four years longer than it should have taken. Can you imagine what type of performance Gordon would have displayed if he weren’t constantly put upon the Royals thrown of franchise satisfaction and instant demands? John Lennon says it best when he gracefully blurts the words “instant karma’s gonna get you! Gonna knock you right in the face!”

Lennon was never more correct…except for that time when he said “give peace a chance.” Oh…and yeah, when he said “All you need is love.” That too.

Yada Yada, off the topic we go…

Back to Kansas City baseball-

Gordon, that poor soul, would have been a little less “seen” publically and would have probably been much more productive because of it. That is the shame in baseball today and anywhere for that matter. A star like Gordon could have been just another player under the radar, drafted by the Phillies or Red Sox in the 2nd or 3rd round, eventually to become a rising star without the entire community screeching at him for instant gratification.  Sometimes being the first pick or being granted rights to the first pick selection is far more hellacious than heavenly.

Unfortunately in the Royal language, we have witnessed more fire and have stumbled upon ways to create more of it.

For every strikeout, error, and missed opportunity…every word that wasn’t said, every press conference that wasn’t up to par, it was all wadded up in a ball, spit on, and thrown in Gordon’s face in a relentless capacity. There were no breaks, no easy days, and no open doors- no motherly nurturing. Alex Gordon was immediately a failure, an outcast, and the best embarrassment story in baseball- one, for a team that just couldn’t pinch off an ounce of good fortune.

Who would want to work for an employer than put the lifeblood of the company on your shoulders from day one? Who would want that?

No one…

The Royals did a poor job of managing the young Alex Gordon and it should be a lesson learned in sport management. Get you players in the door, LET THEM DO THEIR THING, and shut your mouth! Let the results give you reason to speak! As a front office you shouldn’t be biting your nails, hoping and crossing arms with every other Royals fan that Gordon will produce in the present. It’s just embarrassing.

John Buck or Mark Grudzielanek should have been the ones publically harassed. They are the veterans; they were threaded within the organization way more than Gordon, and for that matter should have been to blame.

Alex Gordon’s lack of success and failure to meet public expectations is simply a result of mismanagement and employee misconduct.

Sure every man shall take full responsibility of his own actions, but give a man his own space to fill the canvas. No one likes a hunch…and to Gordon, I’m sure he felt like we all were hunching, lurking, and waiting to attack.

It’s like voters becoming displeased with the President. Saving the global debt crisis and having it eliminated within the first months of presidency is no easy task. Neither is rescuing the Royals!

People want miracles. People want movie script tales to tell their kids years later. It’s in our resulted-oriented DNA. But we are human, and so are the superheroes we draft and vote for.

Let Mike Moustakas breathe. Give him ample time to grasp his role, feel attached, and gain a sense of entitlement and responsibility to the Kansas City Royals. The talent is there, but there is no need to curse what “could have been,” before it actually happens. Learn a lesson from the Gordon incident.

Moustakas doesn’t know the Royals like we do… Give him some time.

Meanwhile, some friendly advice to fans…

Just hush.

  • jim fetterolf

    Moose is at his fourth level in four years and has a history of battling after promotion, then something clicks and he rakes. Going from AAA to the majors is a big step, as Hosmer showed dropping from .400 to .260, so Moose being challenged wasn’t unexpected. He seems a solid, mature kid and I’m fairly certain that he’ll work through it, light up at some point this season, then be a solid producer next year. You can’t teach talent, but experience takes a little time.

    Good post.